Hiroshima Book

Upcoming book release “There's a god for that”

Publication date: October 2012

Narrative Nonfiction

Japan

Eisenhower

Atoms For Peace

August 6 1945

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

Hiroshima-Nagasaki Peace Study Course

V-J Day

Yountville Veterans

The Atoms for Peace program opened the nuclear treasure chest. The next year, the chairman of the United States Atomic Energy Commission predicted that electricity in the future would be “too cheap to meter.”

TITLE

There’s a God for That

SUBTITLE

Optimism in the Face of Earthquakes, Tsunamis and Meltdowns

AUTHOR

Joseph Honton

PUBLISHER

Frankalmoigne, Sebastopol

GENRE

Narrative nonfiction

BOOKSTORE SUBJECTS

TRAVEL / Asia / Japan

RELIGION / Shintoism

POLITICAL SCIENCE / Peace

CATALOGING-IN-PUBLICATION

1. Japan – Religious life and customs

2. Earthquakes – Japan

3. Tsunamis – Japan

4. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (Japan) Accidents

5. Antinuclear movement

6. Ghost stories, Japanese

NOVELIST APPEAL

STORYLINE: Issue-oriented

PACE: Relaxed

TONE: Moving; Reflective

WRITING: Lyrical; Thoughtful; Richly detailed; Stylistically complex

PAGES / WORDS

xvi, 168pp, glossary

40,000 words

MAPS / ILLUSTRATIONS

12 maps, 2 line drawings

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CONTROL NUMBER

2012940666

ISBN

978-0-9856423-0-3 (hardcover)

978-0-9856423-1-0 (pbk.)

978-0-9856423-2-7 (eBook)

978-0-9856423-3-4 (Kindle)

PRICE

US $28.00 (hardcover)

US $16.00 (pbk.)

US $11.99 (eBook)

US $9.99 (Kindle)

AVAILABLE FROM

Wholesale: Ingram

Retail: Frankalmoigne

PUBLICATION DATE

October 2012

From Hiroshima to Fukushima

The nuclear treasure chest is killing us

Someone more qualified than I could better explain the historical developments that link the Hiroshima of 1945 to the Fukushima of 2011, but let me at least sketch an outline.

In the years immediately after Hiroshima, the US kept its secret weapon to itself. But the USSR, wary of allowing the United States to wield unbalanced power, developed its own nuclear weapons program, successfully testing its first bomb in 1949. World War II was supplanted by the Cold War.

In 1953, with the blocs lined up along the Eastern European frontier, the NATO allies worried over being on the world’s front lines once again. President Eisenhower, in a bid to calm nerves, spoke to the UN General Assembly with a “determination to help solve the fearful atomic dilemma.” In his “Atoms for Peace” speech, he proclaimed that “the inventiveness of man shall not be dedicated to his death, but consecrated to his life.” (We must always be on guard when generals talk of death and life.)

The Atoms for Peace program opened the nuclear treasure chest. The next year, the chairman of the United States Atomic Energy Commission predicted that electricity in the future would be “too cheap to meter.” That same year, 1954, the USSR connected the world’s first nuclear power plant to the electric grid; three years later the US followed suit. And today we have a go-go-go mentality that allows neon signs to burn all night long, selling corporate slogans to a sleeping world.

tohoku book

Other new book releases by the same publisher: tohoku book.

This page last updated on Tuesday September 20, 2016.